This website uses cookies to function correctly.
You may delete cookies at any time but doing so may result in some parts of the site not working correctly.
 

CANCER CARE AND INFORMATION

There are three types of cancer screening for adults in England, and they save thousands of lives each year.

Watch a video about breast cancer screening

Cervical screening

Cervical screening is offered to women aged 25 to 64 to check the health of cells in the cervix. It is offered every three years between the ages of 26 and 49, and every five years between the ages of 50 and 64.

Most women's test results show that everything is normal, but for around 1 in 20 women the test will show some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix.

Do I still need to attend my cervical screening when I am invited if I've already had the vaccine?
Yes. It is very important that you still attend regular screening even if you have been vaccinated so that abnormalities caused by HPV types other than those in the vaccine may be detected. Screening can also help to identify small cell cervical cancer, which the HPV vaccine will not fully protect against

Breast cancer screening

Breast cancer screening is offered to women aged 50 to 70 to detect early signs of breast cancer. Women aged 70 and over can self-refer.

Breast cancer screening uses an X-ray test called a mammogram that can spot cancers when they are too small to see or feel. There's a good chance of recovery if the cancer is detected in its early stages.

Bowel cancer screening

There are two types of screening for bowel cancer.

A home testing kit is offered to men and women aged 60 to 74.

Bowel scope screening uses a thin flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end to look at the large bowel. It is offered to men and women at the age of 55 in some parts of England.

Website:

GENERAL INFORMATION Reducing Cancer Risk

 

 

 



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website